Bird Photography…The Jungle Babbler(Seven Sisters)

Bird Photography

•The Jungle Babbler•

Watching live birds in the backyard is always so fascinating but to click them while hopping from tree to tree from plant to plant is rather a tough exercise I would say.

Few facts about Jungle Babbler

The jungle babbler (Turdoides striata) is a member of the family (Leiothrichidae)found in the Indian Subcontinent. They are gregarious birds that forage in small groups of six to ten birds, a habit that has given them the popular name of “Seven Sisters” in urban Northern India, and “Saath bhai”(seven brothers) in West Bengal & Odisha with different other names in other regional languages.

Jungle Babblers are often seen in gardens within large cities as well as in forested areas. In the past, the orange-billed babbler, (Turdoides rufescens),of Sri Lanka was considered to be a subspecies of jungle babbler, but has now been elevated to a species itself.

Watching the Birds in tranquillity is always my passion & I was lucky this time in clicking a few close up shots from my last trip to “Shantiniketan in WB”.

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Jungle Babblers mostly feed on earthworms & insects.

I took these close up shots with my Nikon D7200 along with my Nikkor 70-300 mm ED VR Lens at Shantiniketan & we call it “Satbhaiya” bird in “Odia language”.

#birds #instagram #Shantiniketan #streetphotography #fauna

I have compiled facts from different sources along with my own clicks & I would love to dedicate this Blog to Bird Lovers across the Globe.

#PhotoBySiba

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